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is above sea level rise and certainly when we talk about the environment. as the title of this panel says, along green view. it is absolutely about how the complexities of human decision making, human settlement, individual ambition, always contradictory emotions of people have shape not only what the environment is, we impact it and give them access. but how we think of it to my we formulate the idea of the wild and now often that is based on these often very self-serving tropes that we invented. so the environment is about history, human action. and in this but what i tried to do is to show how some of those crosscurrents work. he said sell thing boils down to the final decisive battle but against the indians to have been an extremely aggressive northern plains tribe who had been the ones first to master horses and had arranged absolutely right through the yellowstone country hunting in the fire all, for example. once there were dealt with the exploration could continue, but one last cautionary note goes back to the question of prison. i think it is very easy when people look at this bo
that that kind of environment will propagate. >> and let me jump in there to try to- to put it in the framework of the class. that is the difficulty. that is the difficulty, because we have, you know, from an ethical point of view, where we're moved towards an understanding that is inclusive- we're being asked to treat other human beings in a way that is not so self-centered. but both of you, actually, i think are saying very similar things, which is there seems to be a problem in that inherent selfishness finds its way into any culture in any religion. what you're saying, susanna, really strikes me with the law profession, is that if you're- and we're back to the experiential dimension- if you conceive of yourself as the spoke in the wheel, you're the hub, the world revolves around you and everybody else is going to ultimately be after you, then it's very difficult to not take the newspapers, to not want to find a way to get ahead, to jump ahead. but you know, that's the way it is in society. warren, go ahead; you've had your hand waving. >> i always hear that this is a very litigious society
different country, we are living in a very different environment where it is no longer patriotism and love and family, it is not terrorists and hate. we have toounderstand that. we have to say we are in fact committed to our liberties and freedom, but you know, the people also deserve to be safe in their neighborhoods and homes. melissa: you think we have to figure out what to do from here, how to live differently, what should have been the indifferently for something like this not happen? >> we have many students in boston. they get here on a student visa from countries all across the world and we are happy about that but once they get here they don't return. many of them don't return and they stay here for 6 years, they marry and become permanent citizens and we don't know if these two young men from chechnya, i know what that places like. i have seen violence in belfast and all these places where i have been, as a diplomat and an ambassador. the other thing is i always -- at the marathon and walking up the street and saw hundreds and hundreds of young people walking around with backpack
senators to reach a deal. but that is sort of the way it has, that the environment now down there. is that deal of theirs between the two of them somhing that is going move forward as legislation? that will be taken seriously by both parties? >> i think it will be taken seriously. i don't know if it will pass or not. we should be focusing on prosecuting and punishing and preventing violent criminals. and we should be safeguarding the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens. all of us were horrified by what happened at sandyhook. i have two children at home and to parent could see chirp senselessly murdered and not be anything but speechless and just taken aback at the depravity and the hor are of it. but it's sad so many politicians are trying to take advantage of the tragedy not to take legislation to target violent criminals but working to take away the second amendment right to keep an bear arms of the law abiding peaceful citizens. let me tell you something interesting most people don't know -- >> lou: senator, could i to this. take this opportunityto go to break very qu
, that the environment now down there. is that deal of theirs between e two of them something that is going move forward as legislation? that will be taken seriously by both parties? >> i think it will be taken seriously. i don't know if it will pass or not. we should be focusing on prosecuting and unishing and preventing violent criminals. and we should be safeguarding the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens. all of us were horrified by what happened at sandyhook. i have two children at home and to parent could see chirp senselessly murdered and not be anything but speechless and just taken aback at the depravity and the hor are of it. but it's sad so many politicians are trying to take advantage of the tragedy not to take legislation to target violent criminals but working to take away the second amendment right to keep an bear arms of the law abiding peaceful citizens. let me tell you something interesting most people don't know -- >> lou: senator, could i to this. take this opportunity to go to break very quickly, because we have run up against one f those things. >> sure. >> lou: if you w
. but that is sort of the way it has, that the environment now down there. is that deal of theirs between the two of them something that is going move forward as legislation? that will be taken seriously by both parties? >> i think it will be taken seriously. i don't know if it will pass or not. we should be focusing on prosecuting and punishing and preventing violent criminals. and we should be safeguarding the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens. all of us were horrified by what happened at sandyhook. i have two children at home and to parent could see chirp senselessly murdered and not be anything but speechless and just taken aback at the depravity and the hor are of it. but it's sad so many politicians are trying to take advantage of the tragedy not to take legislation to target violent criminals but working to take away the second amendment right to keep an bear arms of the law abiding peaceful citizens. let me tell you something interesting most people don't know -- >> lou: senator, could i to this. take this opportunity to go to break very quickly, because we have run up against
-- scare people, but what you should do in this environment is don't get distracted from there, don't go for fear. >> ross, if what you're saying suggests, perhaps, gold still is a safe haven, why do you think so? >> let me qualify that. it's an imperfect safe haven. it's an imperfect safe haven, particularly in the short run. >> against what? >> against financial meltdown or inflation or politicians not doing what they should do, in that case. so it's an insurance plan, if you like. >> is the reason we have this down move is because people are now -- is the gold pricing in the fact we're not going to get more qe out of -- >> it may be. and it's part of the story dwr the shorts have hit gold is not because of what has happened, but because of what hasn't happened. we haven't had hyper inflation. we didn't have the euro collapse. certain things didn't happen. i think that would have aggravated the gold market. fundamentally, it still remains in the short-term a long haven and imperfect. >> if nvs the kind of move, you know, that indicated that if gold were going to respond to more quantit
back to what is a normalized environment. what does that even mean? i can't value it. i don't know how to value. >> i think it's interesting, the mainstream press. the front page of the washington post is the spring swoon and how we cannot seem to escape this economic decline and we've seen the past couple of springs and the front page of the journal is walmart and kohl's taking more time to pay their supplier, a trend they say is getting worse. those are not marginal positives, jim. i look at bank of america. i look at j.p. morgan and i say i'll pay 83.5 for 50,000 j & j. the trade is i don't want to mess with the stuff. proctor, look, he's making the quarter. he's going to make the quarter. >> raw costs coming down and coca-cola, by the way. raw costs are coming down, but they will come down. another one that is just where people are hiding. david, it's hide and don't seek. >> it is, but to carl's point, we've come out of the last few years and animal spirits start to feel strong. >> right. underlying economic growth is strong and everyone is revising up their gdp numbers up to three
our green is universal with green beer. we mean beer production that goes easy on the environment. it's an interesting story and iex breaking right here squawk this morning. miller coor's is reporting that its famous golden colorado brewery, the largest single site brewery on the planet is now weeks away from becoming a zero waste site. what does that moon exactly? more than 99% of brewery waste, glass, plastic, even spent grain gets reused or recycled. interesting story behind this initiative, the idea came from a long time employee, a shop floor technician there with the initial plan to get the company's major breweries to zero waste. for much more on earth week and this story and others, check out green.cnbc.com. kind of an interesting feel good -- and it has to do with beer and drinking. >> i didn't know this. jane wells and tom rotuna on the on assignment desk are doing this whole thing called brew and chew. >> i read about this, too. it's going the be online. >> on cnbc.com. it's all about beer news, food news. jane wells, i saw her in california two weeks ago. she said she prom
. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] (male announcer) live from the bay area here is your kron 4 news >> tub stories we're following in the kron4 morning news is suspicious package as one found near the lotta's fountain ready for a celebration. >> a big rig collision earlier this morning cause and a major back up for it the commute, but george has an update on the hot spot of 580. >> thousands of commuters are expecaffected by this problem. it is not completely clear from the traffic lanes but the resulting back up has reached all the way to the 2 05 interchange. that is still jammed. drive times as the clock that over 2 hours. it is not going to clear up any time soon. even with all the lanes open this will take a long time to clear. when the traffic is backed up like this, it has an accordion affect. it will start to move and then back again in the westbound direction. it just takes a long long time to clear. sadly, this is not our only hot spot. major delays of the bayshore freeway and then out a stamp francisco between s f o and downtown san f
and the potential for further government spending cuts and the regulatory environment. >>> and listen up, everybody.it looks like fed chairman ben bernanke, he's going to to the annual jackson hole symposium this week. it may not sound like a big deal, but this is the first time he's marked that event since 2006. reuters quote the spokes woman who says bernanke is not planning on attending because of a personal scheduling conarthritic. they've used this forum to try ask preview important fed actions. just about every big move they've made along the way he has made public at jackson hole. people have been wondering if he was going to talk about a potential successor this time around. >> can i give you a conspiracy theory? if this is -- this is like your place. if you run the fed, you go to this thing, right? and if this was going to be the last time you could go as the fed chairman, if you thought that he was going to be stepping down next fall or next spring, rather, you probably would find a way to show up. >> actually, i look ate more as him having not made up his mind yet. if you haven't decide
advertisers into an environment with twitter to really understand the social tv space. melissa: what does that mean in english for people that do not understand advertising? >> went to third audience are sitting next to their smart phone and tablet and watching tv. there are conversations happening. their customers include coca-cola, procter and gamble, all of the big names that are out there. they will be able to go on twitter and mine what consumers are talking about. what shows they are watching. it seems like you can collect data. it is endless. >> absolutely. how do we mind these opportunities whether it is direct to understand the conversation. we can make sure that our brands are more fully embedded and engaging. melissa: i am an avid twitter user. it is easy, clean, straightforward. there is not a lot of clutter. what is an add on twitter going to look like and will it ruin the experience? >> i think it will look very different tomorrow than it does today. you want to create advertising that is even more relevant. you wanted to be more engaging. melissa: it is not the difference b
there are that can do no wrong. so what qualifies as a company that can do no wrong in this environment? a couple of things. first, a company makes something with declining raw costs that it charges more for than it used to, and people have to pay that higher price because they have no alternative. and that's pretty much everything that sells at a supermarket or drugstore these days. think about it. what's the raw cost of a drug? virtually nothing. and what can they charge? virtually anything, as we see pretty much nightly these days on "mad money" when we have these execs on that talk about the huge prices they're charging. do you think celgene can't raise the price of revlimid, its breakthrough cancer drug? are you worried regeneron can't raise the price of eylea, an injectable medicine that can make you see again and requires fewer shots in the eye than the competition? i'm not that concerned. how about the toiletries? let's take head & shoulders, the terrific shampoo, not the terrifying chart pattern. the plastic bottle costs less than it used to because of the low price of natural gas courte
of plastic bags and what they have on our environment and wildlife. the ban will apply in all county retail outlets, including grocery stores, convenience stores and pharmacies as well as other shops. the ban does not include restaurant food take-out or bags used for produce, meat, bulk foods and prescription meds. now, if you don't have those reusable bags, the city of menlo park says they will be offering free reusable bags at places likely bay area's or recreation or senior centers. live in menlo park, cate caugiran, kpix 5. >> thank you. in california, we use a total of 20 billion plastic bags and the majority of them end up landlls oras litter. and speaking of trash, an annual unofficial pot party at golden gate park in san francisco left quite the mess for the city to clean up. according to the "chronicle," this weekend's 420 party at the park drew nearly 15,000 people and they left behind a mountain of trash. the clean-up tab for the city, $10,000. >>> speaking of tabs, the town of atherton is asking the white house to pay up. atherton was a fundraising stop for the president earlier
in a diversionary environment? >> obviously the world is very dynamic. we have the report from china that their growth was not as robust as expected. economic act two that he is not quite as robust to support this type of equity market. there are concerns that confidence is fading on the u.s. federal reserve monetary policy as well. >> i think that is part of it. i think what you observe in a marketplace is at the asian market is still very interested in gold. they are very active in this cold environment. earlier this year, the indians were a little bit challenged. this clearly opened up the window for them. lori: let's talk about some of these gold mining stocks. a lot of people were concerned about the gold mining companies. getting back to your discussion with me on production costs versus -- do you think they are on a more bullish trajectory? >> i think we are getting a realignment that is a positive for the industry. lori: would you put new money into shares? >> not a position for us. lori: i appreciate your take. thank you. melissa: will the deadly boston terror attack change
something. about being aware of your environment. if it looks unusual. tell something abit. a -- about it. >> best advice. don't let them affect your life. go back and live your life. >> live your life. when you compromise how you live that gives them a victory. as painful as it is to day. you can't let them succeed by us changing the norm and how we live. can't let them win. no victories. >> i think the last point is so important. you can't let them win. can't say i will not go to the ball game because of what if? that's what they want. >> that's what they want. they want you to stay home and watch this coverage and be too scared to do anything. you have to go out and live your life. important clues, for as chaotic as that look. there are important clues of behind the -- >> the injured. if anybody has hand injuries. some one could be using bomb make mag terl and residue on their hants. >> this shrapnel and things that could have come from the device itself. >> that's right. and pierre thomas is reporting what they want to see is how was it detonated, remotely detona detonated, with a cel
the environment. so, the green button here we are in san francisco, i can say with some public comfort that pg&e is a signatory to the green button, download my data. and basically you go to the utility website. you can download your own green button data which by itself is, well, i'm an energy guy, an energy geek. i consider with confidence. it is not interesting, necessarily, but when you take your green button data and you give it to some companies, they have amazing things they can do with that green button to, again, save you money. something as simple as if you look at your green button which is kilowatt hours for those that are engineering minded, a line grab if you think about t some companies today can look at your green button and figure out if your refrigerator is broken function need a new air conditioner. that's real money if you think about it at a commercial or industrial scale. that is one data set. to your other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the
that only becomes more true in these environments. think about, this isn't islamabad coming online. think about what that does for education, for health. think about 5 billion new witnesses that can document atrocities that are being committed. of course there are challenges but there is a lot of good news ahead of us. >> everybody's empowered. you do a google search when you go to a doctor and instead of sitting there where the doctor is playing god -- >> has all the info -- >> you have as much info as you want going in there and a lot of doctors hate that. you can say wait a second, isn't there a possibility if you do that, this is -- we are empowered in every way from powered by a car and how we're taken care of and also democratically. i had had a political science professor who told me back in the '80s the soviets were mar for worried about a xerox machine than a cruise missile in west germany and she was right. >> the empowerment of information of people is really the way to solve almost every problem. when we went to north korea our idea was that if we could just get a little bit o
things in the environment and i will pound mail that goes to official facilities like capitol hill or white house. this person must have known that this mail could be intercepted but that doesn't absolve of the clumsy murder attempt. he did everything but put his address and fingerprints on envelope. the real risk is not necessarily organized plot or someone trying to perpetrate a terrorist the act but a lone mad scientist with diabolical intent with a apocalyptic vision who has the means to reengineer a virus or a bug. jenna: when we get that scenario, it brings us to the movies. what is the worst case scenario? when people ask you that what do you think is the case scenario when it comes to this substance? >> worst-case scenario, someone who is smart and ph.d scientist and knows how to work on genetic materials like the movie 12 monkeys. jenna: we're into speculation but not necessarily ricin or anthrax or something we know of? >> ricin is not a very potent killer. it is used in the past for targeted as nations but none on the list of 12 compounds the government says is major thr
money printing. in those environments, gold does very well. you have the goldman sachs downgrade. you have people picking sides. then you have the slowing chinese debt. i think that really hits the market all at once. that led to margins being that and they continue to tumble downwards. dagen: talk about the difference you are seeing in behavior. are you seeing any selling among those physical gold owners? >> not as dramatic of a difference. we are a precious metals platform. on friday and monday, we had four to five times as many body and sell orders. we have done our own research. i think that plays into my point. it is somewhat reminiscent to what happened to apple. in the paper market, you have a dramatic selloff. in the physical market, the demand is very, very strong. connell: let's follow up on that. let's talk about apple. the big game for the dollar versus the euro. is that part of the case you make for gold? >> i think part of the reason is for safety. in times like this, i think now is a fantastic entry point. it is certainly better than two weeks ago. it is uncorrelated. t
anything else becoming empowered to look into your environment and what we're seeing from boston, heroes is comi
? >> the average person? >> yes, absolutely. you can. >> what? >> when you go into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if the blast is from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass and severely injure or possible kill. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life
concerned many of the new investments in the current congressional environment strike me as a very heavy lift. i have questions about the proposal to allow cbt to accept money from outside stakeholders. in particular, i would like to know how this proposal relates to plans for the uae. i am concerned that the department has yet again proposed to consolidate 16 targeted homeland security grant pot.ams into a single it has been years since consolidation was proposed and they have not articulated the existing grant programs and how they will be maintained. , we limited resources ensure that they are adequately funded. has two major, it initiatives. the immigratre ahe cycurity. -- youources that unique anticipated advances. >> opening statements may be submitted for the record. i would like to introduce the secretary. she is beginning her fifth year of service said one of the most important cabinet positions of the government. is asary napolitan siro governor and attorney general for the state of arizona. and she was also of the united states attorney. record,appear in the and i now recogniz
be devastating effect on south korea and the seoul and environ that will be the result? do we hae a docrine that says instead of there would be assured destruction? for north korea if they were to carry out such an attack? >> our plans here are solid. they get updated continuously, because we have capability improvement. but make no mistake about it, we would be all in with the air power and the land forces. ewith would counter by invading north korea. we would go to the jugular as quickly as we can. with airpower, where the seat of power is and systematically take the rime down once and for all. if the invation it would take police and encouner the invation first and simultaneously while we are doing that, we'd gawk up on him in terms of the commander and central system, artillery and logistical infrastructure and take regime down. >> lou: are you still confident a conflict can be avoided? >> guest: yeah, i am. as i said went to know for sure but i think he will probablfire a missile. and i suspect the exercises are about to end at theend of month. that should bring the chanter to a close.
. the whole idea of the urban environment derailed, but the plans put forward for the park and for the national park. the same state and federal officials of the philadelphians are dealing with for the u.n. proposal were the ones who also were going to sign off on the part. this interesting connections there certainly. >> charlene, just being aware of time is here, but to continue the dialogue. i'd like to thank her again for her presentation. [applause] >> where the conservative book local action conference in washington d.c. with author paul kengor of "the communist." who was frank marshall davis? >> frank marshall davis was born in kansas 1905, died and made you and 87. ended up in chicago and ultimately honolulu and that's where he would meet a young man named barack obama in the 70s. he was introduced by obama's grandfather, stanley dunham. i should back up a little bit. he was african-american. he was a republican from the time of lincoln to fdr. remarkably what so far to the left that during world war ii he joined the communist party. he joined communist party u.s.a.
from criticism that it ignored the threat he environment in benghazi. we're back with the panel. it goes on kirsten. >> what difference does it makes a secretary clinton would say democrats are claiming political hit job by the republicans and frequently these things do get politicized but i would say the democrats were welcomed to be part of this, i'm sure and nobody is stopping them from investigating benghazi and they embarrassed themselves during the hearings, spending the whomentd time trying to make up stories for why the administration dropped the ball on this. so, one of the most interesting things in this is that secretary clinton, when she was testifying, said that she was not aware that nothing came to her attention in terms of security for the embassy and, in fact, it turns out that it did. and her exact words were i made it very clear the security cables did not come to my attention or above the assistant secretary level. well it did go above the assistant secretary level. it wally actually went to her office. weather she saw it or not is a different question it def
environment. jetblue, united, southwest all up as well today. sue? >>> ty, this is the financial equivalent of the super bowl of quarterly reports. apple releasing numbers after the bell today, the stock, which has taken a beating recently now traiting above $400. not by much, but they'll take it. investors may be coming back, but what do consumers this i? that story next when pow per continues. [ female announcer ] it's time for the annual shareholders meeting. ♪ there'll be the usual presentations on research. and development. some new members of the team will be introduced. the chairman emeritus will distribute his usual wisdom. and you? well, you're the chief life officer. you just need the right professional to help you take charge. ♪ >>> all right. the market's kind of fallen apart. it's whipsawed all the way back up. so take a look at the right-hand side. we saw the dow jones industrial average go from a garch of 135 points to negative 12 in under a minute and a half. this is all sorts of rumors, and we'll follow those up. the market has bounced way back up again, but the volume
, find jobs and a tough environment. they cannot afford to move out to the suburbs or go to a private school. a lifeline. what they want to do is cut off the lifeline and cast these children and draft. very unfair, and people should be outraged. gerri: to follow-up on your idea, there was a big teachers' strike not too long ago. guess which ticket -- teachers showed up to work? the people at the charter schools. thank you for coming on. great topic. great information. appreciate your time. of course, we always want to know what you think. here is our question. should you miss the end of our education system? log on to gerriwillis.com. but on the right hand side of the screen now will share the results. coming up, two new editions. social media can boost the bottom lin new survesow's that may not be the case. our panel weighs in next. ♪ copd makes it hard to breathe... but with advair, i'm breathing better. soow i can help make this a great block party. ♪ [ male announce advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair co
in a challenging economic environment. the question for all of us is how long willho that last that e consumers held up relatively well. i think we alsoly see that in spending and the credit risk -- or formants which have substantially come down verall, they're at close to historical lows. we're performing a50% better than the major bank card issuers. so i think that that demonstrates some view that the consumer health is pretty decent. consumer confidence held up pretty well. but, frankly, david, i've really been of the view not surprisingly that the economic recovery as i look at in the broad scale is going to be relatively slow. i don't have a great deal of confidence that there's going to be any turnaround in the near term. and i think what we've got to hope for is that it >> over the last, certainly over the last four years of this administration part of a long-term trend as i've outlined in the book is using more and more state power to impose a particular worldview called liberalism and i will go into a definition of that so we are not using terms loosely but as a christian i am worried
slices so everybody can eat. you need to get more pizza. in order to do that you need an environment good for business. and i think they have all lost sight of that. it's not about taxes, redistribution. >> are you looking for a quick fix? >> there's no quick fix to this. there's a very difficult fix to this and things if both sides will have to do that are uncomfortable in the short run. lying about it isn't going to make it better. by saying social security, medicare, medicaid aren't in trouble, is not going to make it better. >> working so well. >> despicable. >> bob, thank you for coming in today. >> thank you. >> j.j., rick, see you soon. thank you. >> always a pleasure. >> our guest host will be with us the rest of the show. >> very excited this morning. >> tell us what you really think. coming up, more on goldman sack's earnings report. beating the streets expectations by 40%. up next, reaction from financial sector analysts. the one and only dick bove. ♪ ♪ the new blackberry z10 with time shift and blackberry balance. built to keep you moving. see it in action at blackberry.co
. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations' with kroll and humane degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. law and international treaty obligations this conclusion is and based upon our own personal impressions, but rather grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes the torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees and many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constituting torture. but you look at the united states state department and its annual country reports
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
for a few hours and to institute special targeting rules both in the air environment and at the canadian border environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. with respect to fema, i can, when saw the response in boston and a coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november, boston held a massive exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event. and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercise is supported by the committee through fema to local areas, and again increasing our ability for response and resilience. we have worked with the fbi and ietotate lct ross e critical infrarurs d oprators, and we've been reaching out to faith-based organizations, community organizations and others who want to know what they can do. we are implementing a number of security measures, both seen and unseen at airports, transit hubs within the maritime environment, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is provided security on the ferries in the boston area. viper teams are doing searches on terms of ground transporta
to this environment. >> clayton: would you need to show that the suspect was abouting on behalf of foreign power or in capacity as a military combatant to try him in a military trial? >> that is correct or treat him, put him in military system. we have don't have all the facts but the arguement is this. his older brother was inducted in al-qaeda affiliateddentity while he was being trained in russia. he came back and inducted his own brother. not all the facts on the table but what is troubling to me and senator whose statement you read is the administration is utterly uninterested in exploring this. they want the option off the table. instead of waiting for days or a couple of weeks until all the facts are in. i will be the first one to say if the facts don't support the classification as enemy combatant we should not do that, but we should not rush the process to give benefit of treating it as enemy combatant. >> clayton: what stood out to me the president's comments we're safe. we got him there. seemed to be a sense of wait a second, do we know all of the details yet? do we know the connectio
to bring a little kin to the environment. here's some of what you said. r.d. copeland tweeted us, i build raw bale and ear plasr homes. can you explain what that means? >> he's got two brothers. >> i was thinking the same thing. >> we applaud him for what he's doing. >> i bet it smells goodtoo. >> another one. lindsay says her forite way to save the planet,sing cloth apers an wipes. >> i heard about that when i had my daughter. >> and then what happened? >> i think i tried it for, like, two days. >> you have to watch them. i thought the smell, and the sink is full of you know what. >> why do you hate the environment? >> willie! >> giada knows being green is a ar round deal. she's been working with ks in an elementary school in l.a. to plant a gardennd grow their own food. >> that's terrific. >> how did this come about? >> what i did in partnership with my agency is that we adopted the school i compton, californ. it's foster elementa, and there's a lot of actual kids who are foster kids in the school. what i really wanted to do tru was just allow them to have a pleasant, fun, educational e
with our reduced output so the faith is still there, that it's well run in a bad macro economic environment which comes back to mcdonald's which you have a note out today from sus can dehanna which says it is executing across the world and it is stable in its market share or gaining and it is against it. that seems to be the major theme. >> another theme that's sort of emerged in these big companies, citigroup, as well is the strength of the latin american consumer and the latin american corporation. caterpillar noting that lshg, even though china continues to be weak and there seems to be a shift from asia pacific to latin america coming from these multinationals. >> resuming the buyback does not hurt by the end of the year. it had approved for a while in '07. >> and that might be taking some of the sting out of this today. >> when we come back, yet another price target cut for apple ahead of its earnings and this time from bmo. colin gilles over at bgc is upgrading the stock this morning. which one is right? we'll hear from both analysts this morning. the dow coming off its worst week sin
universal all week long for our green week coverage from the politics of the environment, to the ways we can all work together to help go green. >>> coming up, authorities foil another terrorist plot, this one targeting passenger trains. >>> plus the road to redemption. congressman todd aiken trying to make a political comeback or just a statement? why he's just one in a long line of long shots trying for a second, or in some cases third act. >>> when was the last time a south carolina democrat won a u.s. house seat previously held by a republican? first person to tweet the answer gets the shout-out. the answer including more on the keystone pipeline after "the daily rundown." ♪ i've got the power people lose 5x more weight following the weight watchers approach than trying on their own. you can too. the new weight watchers 360 program. join for free and check out the new risk free guarantee today. because it works. and check out the new risk free guarantee today. geico and we could help youo save on boat and motorcycle insurance too. other insurance companies are green with envy. oh, no,
on the environment and wildlife. let's look at where the ban applies. these include grocery stores, convenience stores, pharmacies as well as other shops. the ban does not include restaurants food takeouts or bags used for produce, meat, bulk foods d prescription meds. we want to make note, if you don't have that reusable bag handy starting today here in those san mateo county cities, you will have to pay 10 cents for a paper bag and that fee is going up in 2015. it will go up to 25 cents per paper bag. so it's a good investment to make right now. live in menlo park, cate caugiran, kpix 5. >> by the end of the year, at least 17 cities in san mateo county will have implemented that plastic bag ban. >>> new this morning, it turns out a new waterfront development deal in oakland requires a substantial down payment from taxpayers. our own phil matier reports that to help swing the deal with chinese backing, oakland has agreed to spend about $25 million in unused redevelopment money. that money would be used to buy two parcels of land from the signature development group. >>> later today oakland sch
the business rules fixed for this environment, and we think that this will be sufficient in 14. >> other questions for the record. that last question was something that i know you and i have talked about, how to maximize delivery to the veterans in tough locations, rural locations we will see one coming in a thank you for that effort. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i apologize for being late. i have been following some of the testimony. want to thank your for your service. mr. secretary, particularly for your active duty service to our nation. now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing the resources available to our veterans in a very difficult time fiscally. let me begin with the senators area of inquiry relating to the electronic of record. i had understood that you described what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. >> we're talking about clam's year, completing the claims. >> the electronic record. >> the electronic health record complete certified. >> let me talk. the electronic health record system is still g
of the environment that were involved in the blast. >> reporter: that same trauma surgeon saying some of the patients have to come back again and again for repeat operations. also saying that he has never seen anything, john, like the volume, the quantity of people that were rushed into his er immediately following this attack. >> that's what we keep hearing, poppy. the numbers were just staggering. so how prepared were they really for this flood of victims? >> reporter: you can say fortunately they were prepared. fortunately for a situation as they wished would never happen because they told us they prepare for things like this, massachusetts general, saying that within minutes after they got their first patient and after the attack they instituted an incident command system within five to ten minutes. they had enough surgeons. they even told us they had people flying back in, coming within hours back to the hospital from trips to try to help and do everything that they could. but they were prepared and they do have the hands needed at this point in time, john. >> you know, poppy, i did. i heard fro
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
's something that would have to be part of an agreement and acceptable to republicans in this environment, it is something we can defend on a technical basis. it's more accurate and because for middle class people, you know, it's a burden that is relatively small. the most vulnerable even $10 a month for the most vulnerable is a big deal. if you live to be 90 years old and all you have is the social security, that $10 can be the difference between food in the last couple of days of the month. so i think we have to distinguish between what impact going a more correct measure would have. and we have, you know, put in a way that we think is fair. by saying that the most vulnerable have the benefit go up. not because we have the overall adjustment being faster. we will make the decision to go in and make sure they're not hurt. >> thank you. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for appearing. i have four sets of questions i'm going run through quickly. supplementally. first thing has to do with the crap i look at the budget. how it's crurkted. because the choice of the underpinnings of the a
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
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